Altitude sickness can ruin your hike. Here’s how to prevent it. (2023)

The views from the heights of mountainous regions can be magical and spectacular, but not if you’re bent over, huffing and puffing, nauseated, and nursing a headache. Often referred to as acute mountain sickness, altitude sickness can occur as low as 5,000 feet, and get more severe the closer you get to 10,000 feet. It can take many forms, too: Only some are serious, but all of them can put a damper on your adventures.

If you’re headed up, here’s how to prepare and treat symptoms, and what to look out for to ensure you stay happy and healthy while closer to the sky.

What causes altitude sickness

Contrary to popular belief, altitude sickness doesn’t happen because there’s less oxygen the higher you go.

“You’re still breathing 21 percent oxygen, it’s just more spread out,” explains Graham Prather, education manager at National Outdoors Leadership School (NOLS) and in charge of wilderness medicine courses.

[Related: Tips for picking the best hiking trail]

(Video) Altitude Sickness - Recognising the Symptoms

It’s not a matter of composition, but concentration. At high altitudes, there’s less atmospheric pressure, which reduces the number of oxygen molecules in a given volume of air compared to the same volume at a lower elevation. For example, at 10,000 feet, you only get 69 percent of the oxygen you’d get at sea level.

Essentially, the higher you go, the less efficient your breathing becomes, resulting in less and less oxygen every time you inhale. In response, your body tries to get the oxygen it needs, so you start breathing more rapidly. But despite this effort, there’s still less oxygen making it into your blood and muscles, which is why physical activities feel so much harder at higher elevations. This condition is called hypoxia, and it’s what causes altitude sickness symptoms to set in.

What are the symptoms of altitude sickness

Altitude sickness is not fun and it’s definitely not easy to ignore. Symptoms will likely involve a headache, nausea, possibly vomiting, and maybe even loss of appetite. Sometimes it may also be accompanied by the extremely aggravating combination of tiredness and insomnia.

“It felt like a really bad hangover,” says Prather about the first time he experienced altitude sickness.

It’s a feeling that usually hits within a day or two of arriving at a high-altitude destination, but you may still feel mild symptoms like lightheadedness before that, especially when bending over and standing up quickly, or walking up stairs.

In addition to this, great elevations also make you more susceptible to dehydration, which can exacerbate the symptoms of altitude sickness. That’s in part because every time you breathe out you expel moisture, so an increased respiration rate results in your body losing more water than usual. And the dry conditions that come with higher elevations don’t help: the lack of humidity makes moisture evaporate quickly, which can trick you into thinking you’re not sweating as much as you are and don’t need to rehydrate. Drinking a lot of water is crucial, especially in the first few days of acclimatization.

“We cannot hydrate away altitude sickness, but we can at least not be dehydrated on top of it,” Prather offers.

(Video) 9 Things Backpackers MUST Know To Avoid Altitude Sickness

Most of the time, these symptoms are not life-threatening and only require acclimatization to abate. But especially at elevations over 10,000 feet, symptoms can worsen and lead to more severe health conditions: High altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE).

HACE typically comes with a loss of balance, episodes of confusion, and possibly a severe headache. On the other hand, HAPE presents itself with decreased stamina, breathlessness (even at rest), and a persistent cough that starts out sounding dry and transitions to wet, signaling the presence of fluid in the lungs. HAPE is more common than HACE, but both can be deadly, which is why it’s important to head down in elevation as soon as you start experiencing symptoms.

Who’s at risk of altitude sickness

Unfortunately, science hasn’t identified any specific markers for who may or may not suffer from altitude sickness. The only indicator seems to be that if you’ve suffered symptoms before, it could happen again. But at the same time, if you’ve never experienced symptoms it doesn’t necessarily mean you never will.

Not even athletes or people in excellent shape are immune. In fact, Prather says those tend to be who he’s most worried about when leading trips, as non-athletes tend to listen to their bodies and pay attention to symptoms, whereas athletes may try to push through the pain or discomfort.

How to prevent altitude sickness

There are three main factors that affect not only your risk of developing altitude illness, but the magnitude of hypoxic stress you put your body through—elevation, how quickly you’re ascending, and your level of exertion. Fortunately, you can prepare for each of them.

(Video) ALTITUDE SICKNESS

Start by planning ahead and allowing enough time for acclimatization. Don’t expect to land in Quito, Ecuador (9,350 feet above sea level), the Himalayas (29,032 feet), or even Denver (5,279 feet) and immediately set out to summit even a moderate peak. Your body needs between 24 and 48 hours to adjust to new altitudes, but the time it takes you to fully acclimatize may vary. The National Outdoor Leadership School’s curriculum specifies that “if you travel to 10,000 feet or above quickly, take two to three rest days with light exercise.” If you take time to get acclimated, symptoms won’t likely hit as hard.

Once you’ve given your body time to get used to the new conditions, don’t rush into summiting anything—the faster you climb, the more likely you are to suffer symptoms. If you have a multi-day hike to higher elevations ahead of you, Prather recommends spreading the trip across several more days, so that once you’re above 10,000 feet, you and your team can ascend in stages where each night you sleep at altitudes no more than 1,500 feet higher than the night before. Throw in frequent rest days, too.

If you can, consider spending the night at lower elevations, as sleeping at high altitudes is even harder on your body. To do this, you can go on climbing trips during the day, and then go down to your base camp at night.

Before, during, or even after a hike at altitude, avoid alcohol (especially when you first arrive and your body is not yet acclimated) and sedatives to help you sleep, as they can make symptoms worse. Both these substances, Prather explains, depress your drive to breathe by slowing your breathing and making every breath more shallow than usual, which is the opposite of what you need at high altitude.

“You want your respiratory drive to be responsive to the atmosphere you’re in,” he says.

(Video) High Altitude Illness: Prevention and Treatment

How to treat altitude sickness

Altitude sickness can be sneaky, so even if you tried your best at prevention, you may still experience symptoms. When it comes to feeling better, light exercise can help, so take an easy walk to get your respiratory rate up. Since nausea is one of the most common symptoms, it’s possible you may not feel like eating, but you should also make a point to maintain adequate nutrition to stay in good health.

Over-the-counter pain meds like ibuprofen and acetaminophen can help lessen the severity of headaches, but avoid anything stronger, like opiates, which have a similar effect to alcohol and sedatives, Prather says.

[Related: Does training at high altitudes help Olympians win?]

If you are expecting to experience altitude sickness, ask your doctor about acetazolamide. This drug can alleviate symptoms of altitude sickness by speeding up your respiratory drive. It works by changing your blood’s Ph to be more acidic, which makes your body believe there’s too much carbon dioxide. As a result, your system makes your breathing faster and deeper in an attempt to eliminate carbon dioxide, resulting in a higher concentration of oxygen.

Finally, if altitude sickness persists or worsens despite your best prevention and treatment efforts, take Prather’s words as your new motto: “Don’t go up until your symptoms go down”. If there’s no improvement, it may be time to head to a lower elevation. Don’t worry—you can always try again next time.

(Video) 5 Ways to Fight Altitude Sickness Brittany's Travel Hacks

FAQs

How do you prevent altitude sickness when hiking? ›

Here are some things you can do to prevent yourself from getting altitude sickness.
  1. Climb slowly. Your body needs about two to three days of slowly going higher in order to adjust to the changes. ...
  2. Eat carbs. It's not often we're told to eat extra carbohydrates. ...
  3. Avoid alcohol. ...
  4. Drink water. ...
  5. Take it easy. ...
  6. Sleep lower. ...
  7. Medication.

What are 3 effects of being at altitude? ›

You'll likely feel nauseous and lightheaded. You may vomit and have a headache. Different levels of altitude sickness have different symptoms: Symptoms of mild, short-term altitude sickness usually begin 12 to 24 hours after arriving at high altitude.

What is the immediate cure to altitude sickness? ›

Rest, keep warm, and have plenty of liquids. Don't go any higher until your symptoms are completely gone. If your symptoms are severe, or if mild symptoms don't go away in a couple of days or get worse, get to a lower elevation as quickly as possible. Don't exert yourself.

What are 2 major problems Your body has at high altitude? ›

There are two main types of severe altitude sickness: high altitude pulmonary oedema (fluid within the lungs) and high altitude cerebral oedema (fluid within the brain). In most cases, both conditions occur at the same time. A person with pulmonary oedema may drown if their lungs fill with too much fluid.

How do you prepare for altitude hiking? ›

When heading out on a high altitude hiking trip, make sure to drink extra water, wear extra sunscreen, and wear proper clothing with enough coverage including hats and sunglasses. Lip balm is must to soothe those cracked lips! While hiking, move at a slower pace, find a rhythm, take breaks as needed, and breath deeply.

How can I increase my lung capacity for hiking? ›

5 Ways to Increase Lung Capacity
  1. Strengthen Muscles & Increase Stamina. Improving your exercise tolerance will help you increase your lung capacity for hiking, build stronger muscles, and increase your stamina so you can crush that long hike! ...
  2. Breathwork. ...
  3. Stretching. ...
  4. Practice Good Posture. ...
  5. Hike More.
22 Sept 2022

Who should avoid high altitudes? ›

Travelers with medical conditions such as heart failure, myocardial ischemia (angina), sickle cell disease, any form of pulmonary insufficiency or preexisting hypoxemia, or obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) should consult a physician familiar with high-altitude medical issues before undertaking such travel (Table 3-05).

What is the fastest way to adjust to high altitude? ›

Ascend gradually. Avoid traveling from a low elevation to an elevation higher than 9,000 feet (2,750 m) above sea level in one day. If possible, spend a few days at 8,000–9,000 feet before traveling to a higher elevation. This gives your body time to adjust to the lower oxygen levels.

Does altitude affect memory? ›

Sustained exposure to high altitude leads to cognitive decrement, such as impairment in attention, memory, judgment and emotion4. Research has demonstrated that cognitive impairment due to altitude starts at 2,500 m above sea level5,6,7, because brain vulnerability to hypoxia increases beginning at 2,500 m8.

What kills at high altitude? ›

High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE)

HAPE is a fluid build-up in the lungs that usually develops 24 to 96 hours after a rapid ascent to over 8,000 feet (2,500 meters). It can occur in people even if they don't have symptoms of AMS. HAPE is responsible for most deaths due to altitude illness.

Can you take anything to prevent altitude sickness? ›

If a slow ascent isn't possible because you are flying into your destination or have traveled to high altitude before and have a history of acute altitude sickness, medications like acetazolamide, also called Diamox, are good preventive options.

Which medicine is best for high altitude? ›

Acetazolamide, or Diamox, is the standard medical prophylaxis agent for high altitude illness. The medication is effective in preventing acute mountain sickness (AMS), high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE).

Does altitude affect you more as you age? ›

Headache, nausea, shortness of breath and sleeplessness are some of the symptoms to which even the healthiest, most physically fit individuals can succumb. But as people age, they are less prone to acute mountain sickness, according to Dr.

How can I prevent altitude sickness naturally? ›

One of the most effective natural remedies for altitude sickness is to have garlic and cloves. Garlic helps to thin the blood vessels and enhances the flow of blood in the body. It also helps to lower the feeling of dizziness and nausea. Similarly, cloves also help the body use oxygen more efficiently.

Which organ is affected by altitude sickness? ›

Altitude sickness can affect your lungs, in which case it is sometimes known as high altitude pulmonary oedema or HAPE. People with HAPE can feel short of breath and have a cough and a racing heart. In extreme cases, their lips turn blue.

What should I eat before high altitude? ›

Foods that are high in carbohydrates and potassium can be helpful in alleviating the symptoms of altitude sickness. Before you start your ascent, load up on bread, fruits, pasta, and other heavy carb meals. Avoid eating foods that are high in sodium as this can lead to dehydration of your body's tissues.

What are the 7 tips for hiking? ›

  • Tip #1 – Get the gear. Reduce the risk of injury by having good gear and being properly prepared for the hike. ...
  • Tip #2 – Map it out. ...
  • Tip #3 – Hydrate. ...
  • Tip #4 – Extra layers. ...
  • Tip #5 – The buddy system. ...
  • Tip #6 – Don't light fires on any mountain. ...
  • Tip #7 – Never underestimate.
9 Feb 2021

How can I help my body adjust to altitude? ›

  1. Drink Lots of Water. As you gain altitude, your body tends to lose water and salt faster than you're used to. ...
  2. Reduce Your Exercise. ...
  3. Get Enough Sleep. ...
  4. Limit Your Alcohol Intake. ...
  5. Increase Your Potassium Levels. ...
  6. Protect Yourself From the Sun. ...
  7. Consume More Calories. ...
  8. Consider Taking Acetazolamide.
21 Mar 2017

What are 3 exercises that increase your lung capacity? ›

If you are seeking to begin increasing the capacity of your lungs, rib stretching, abdominal breathing, and pushing out can be a great start!

What is the best exercise to increase lung capacity? ›

Some of the best cardio exercises to expand lung capacity are running, jogging, swimming, or you can even hit the gym to work out on heavy machines. Just make sure you warm up and cool down before and after the workout.

How can I clear mucus from my lungs? ›

Use your stomach muscles to forcefully expel the air. Avoid a hacking cough or merely clearing the throat. A deep cough is less tiring and more effective in clearing mucus out of the lungs. Huff Coughing: Huff coughing, or huffing, is an alternative to deep coughing if you have trouble clearing your mucus.

Is Tylenol or Advil better for altitude sickness? ›

Ibuprofen has been shown to be more effective than placebo in the treatment of high altitude headache (HAH), but nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents have been linked to increased incidence of gastrointestinal (GI) side effects and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE).

Is high altitude good for the elderly? ›

According to studies, people over age 65+ tolerate moderate altitude better than expected. Residency at higher altitude is associated with lower mortality. Studies have also shown that there is a 50% lower risk of dying from Alzheimer's disease compared to those living at lower altitudes.

How do you sleep at high altitudes? ›

Hypoxemia at high altitude is most severe during sleep. Acetazolamide improves sleep, AMS symptoms, and hypoxemia at high altitude. Low doses of a short acting benzodiazepine (temazepam) may also be useful in improving sleep in high altitude.

Does canned oxygen work for altitude sickness? ›

Quandary: Oxygen cans, altitude sickness and home remedies (Q&A column) Dear Quandary, Are cans of oxygen good for altitude sickness? In a word, no.

What vitamins help with altitude sickness? ›

A double-blind trial of 18 mountaineers climbing to the Mt. Everest base camp found that use of an antioxidant vitamin supplement (providing 1,000 mg of vitamin C, 400 IU of vitamin E, and 600 mg of lipoic acid daily) significantly improved symptoms of altitude sickness as compared to placebo.

Does everyone get altitude sickness? ›

Risk factors. Altitude sickness affects 25% to 85% of people traveling to high altitudes.

What is the healthiest altitude to live at? ›

What could be better! Dr. Elizabeth Egan in her excellent book, Notes from Higher Grounds, shares that “the optimal altitude at which to live is somewhere between 2,100 m (6,900 feet) and 2,500 m (8,200 feet).” Estes Park is in that sweet spot between these two figures, at 7,500 feet above sea level.

At what altitude do you start feeling effects? ›

At elevations more than 5280 feet above sea level people may start to feel the effects of altitude. This varies for every individual so some people may not feel effects until they reach elevations greater than 8000 feet.

Does altitude affect anxiety? ›

People exposed to high altitudes often experience somatic symptoms triggered by hypoxia, such as breathlessness, palpitations, dizziness, headache, and insomnia. Most of the symptoms are identical to those reported in panic attacks or severe anxiety.

Why is it called the death zone? ›

"Dead zone" is a more common term for hypoxia, which refers to a reduced level of oxygen in the water. Less oxygen dissolved in the water is often referred to as a “dead zone” because most marine life either dies, or, if they are mobile such as fish, leave the area.

What causes the most deaths from altitude illness? ›

The most common causes of death at high altitude include, but are not limited to hypothermia, blunt force trauma, avalanche-related deaths, carbon monoxide intoxication, lightning, hyponatremia, drug and alcohol intoxication, and preexisting natural disease.

How many mountains have a death zone? ›

Mount Everest isn't the only peak with a death zone. In fact, the world's 14 highest mountains all have death zones. All of these are located in the Himalaya and Karakoram Ranges on the continent of Asia. Some avid mountain climbers make it their goal to reach the top of all 14.

Does drinking water prevent altitude sickness? ›

Myth #4 - Drinking extra water will protect you from altitude illness. Staying hydrated is important at altitude. Symptoms of dehydration are similar to AMS. In reality you only need an additional liter to a liter and a half of water at altitude.

Does Tylenol help prevent altitude sickness? ›

"These results suggest that acetaminophen performs similar to ibuprofen in the prevention of AMS in partially-acclimatized subjects." AMS is potentially deadly. The condition can often start out with symptoms normally associated with altitude sickness: headache, dizziness, fatigue, upset stomach, and poor sleep.

Does ibuprofen help prevent altitude sickness? ›

“You don't want to feel horrible for 15 to 20 percent of your vacation,” Lipman said. “Ibuprofen could be a way to prevent AMS in a significant number of the tens of millions of people who travel to high altitudes each year.”

Does Benadryl help with altitude? ›

Many people develop a persistent, bothersome cough and cold-like symptoms in the cold dry air of high altitude. An antihistamine at night like Benadryl 25 mg may help suppress the cough.

Does altitude affect blood pressure? ›

Altitude exposure is known to cause an increase in adrenergic activity, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in resting conditions.

How much water should I drink at altitude? ›

The IAM recommends drinking an extra 1-1.5 liters of water daily at high-altitude, for a total of 3-4 liters. Ideally, those 3-4 liters would contain 2-300 grams of carbohydrates. Supplementing electrolytes is important for any high-output activity, but it becomes crucial at higher altitudes as well.

Is high altitude good for your heart? ›

Activities at higher altitudes such as skiing, hiking, bicycling or climbing can place too much stress on the heart and blood vessels due to lower levels of oxygen and fluctuations in air pressure, temperature and humidity.

Does altitude affect your brain? ›

Hypoxia associated with high altitude exposure (>2500m) has detrimental effects on human health. The brain is highly sensitive to hypoxia, and higher elevations can impair cognitive and psychomotor performance.

How do you prevent altitude sickness when hiking? ›

Here are some things you can do to prevent yourself from getting altitude sickness.
  1. Climb slowly. Your body needs about two to three days of slowly going higher in order to adjust to the changes. ...
  2. Eat carbs. It's not often we're told to eat extra carbohydrates. ...
  3. Avoid alcohol. ...
  4. Drink water. ...
  5. Take it easy. ...
  6. Sleep lower. ...
  7. Medication.

What is the only cure for altitude sickness? ›

The main treatment for altitude sickness is to move to a lower elevation as quickly and safely as possible. At the very least, do not go higher. If symptoms are mild, staying at your current elevation for a few days might be enough to improve the symptoms.

What herb is good for altitude sickness? ›

The most commonly used herb is Gingko biloba, It is play an important role in AMS prevention, it has tonic effect on the brain, stimulate blood circulation and reduce oxygen requirement of the body, although several negative trials have also been published but still better than the synthetic drugs 51-52..

What are 2 major problems Your body has at high altitude? ›

There are two main types of severe altitude sickness: high altitude pulmonary oedema (fluid within the lungs) and high altitude cerebral oedema (fluid within the brain). In most cases, both conditions occur at the same time. A person with pulmonary oedema may drown if their lungs fill with too much fluid.

Is altitude sickness worse at night? ›

The symptoms of altitude sickness include: A headache, which is usually throbbing. It gets worse during the night and when you wake up.

Why do you urinate more at high altitude? ›

Loss of water due to more frequent urination. As the body acclimates to higher altitude (for most this means an altitude greater then 8,200 feet), one urinates more often as the body works to avoid respiratory alkalosis (elevated blood PH) by your kidneys excretion of bicarbonate.

› health › altitude-sickess-pre... ›

Altitude sickness is common when people are traveling and either climbing or being transported to a higher elevation quickly. The higher you climb, the lower th...
People living at lower altitudes who enjoy a winter ski vacation may be at risk for acute altitude sickness (acute mountain sickness), the most common of the so...

Altitude sickness - NHS

https://www.nhs.uk › conditions › altitude-sickness
https://www.nhs.uk › conditions › altitude-sickness
You can get altitude sickness if you travel to a high altitude too quickly. Breathing becomes difficult because you're not able to take in as much oxygen. A...

What is the fastest way to adjust to altitude? ›

  1. Drink Lots of Water. As you gain altitude, your body tends to lose water and salt faster than you're used to. ...
  2. Reduce Your Exercise. ...
  3. Get Enough Sleep. ...
  4. Limit Your Alcohol Intake. ...
  5. Increase Your Potassium Levels. ...
  6. Protect Yourself From the Sun. ...
  7. Consume More Calories. ...
  8. Consider Taking Acetazolamide.
21 Mar 2017

Does drinking water prevent altitude sickness? ›

Myth #4 - Drinking extra water will protect you from altitude illness. Staying hydrated is important at altitude. Symptoms of dehydration are similar to AMS. In reality you only need an additional liter to a liter and a half of water at altitude.

Is there anything for altitude sickness? ›

Take it as directed. Take an over-the-counter pain medicine, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), or naproxen (Aleve). Read and follow all instructions on the label. If available, you may also be able to use oxygen or a specially designed pressure chamber to treat altitude sickness.

What vitamins help prevent altitude sickness? ›

Everest base camp found that use of an antioxidant vitamin supplement (providing 1,000 mg of vitamin C, 400 IU of vitamin E, and 600 mg of lipoic acid daily) significantly improved symptoms of altitude sickness as compared to placebo.

What kills at high altitude? ›

High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE)

HAPE is a fluid build-up in the lungs that usually develops 24 to 96 hours after a rapid ascent to over 8,000 feet (2,500 meters). It can occur in people even if they don't have symptoms of AMS. HAPE is responsible for most deaths due to altitude illness.

Why do I pee more at altitude? ›

At altitude, a very common reaction is increased urinary output. The body's kidneys sense the lower level of oxygen immediately and kick into high gear. The kidneys release a hormone, erythropoetin, that commands the bone marrow to produce more red blood cells to increase the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood.

How should I sleep at high altitude? ›

Hypoxemia at high altitude is most severe during sleep. Acetazolamide improves sleep, AMS symptoms, and hypoxemia at high altitude. Low doses of a short acting benzodiazepine (temazepam) may also be useful in improving sleep in high altitude.

What is the best drink for high altitude? ›

Drink Water

Sports drinks like Gatorade or all-natural options like coconut water are great alternatives and fuel your body with electrolytes for better hydration. You can even save money by using a reusable water bottle like a Yeti or Hydroflask.

What foods help with altitude sickness? ›

Foods that are high in carbohydrates and potassium can be helpful in alleviating the symptoms of altitude sickness. Before you start your ascent, load up on bread, fruits, pasta, and other heavy carb meals. Avoid eating foods that are high in sodium as this can lead to dehydration of your body's tissues.

Is Gatorade good for altitude sickness? ›

Often you can alleviate the symptoms with a few simple tricks: Hydrate as much as possible with water and Gatorade. Take a dose of ibuprofen or Excedrin.

Is Tylenol or Advil better for altitude sickness? ›

Ibuprofen has been shown to be more effective than placebo in the treatment of high altitude headache (HAH), but nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents have been linked to increased incidence of gastrointestinal (GI) side effects and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE).

What are 4 symptoms of altitude sickness? ›

AMS is the most common form of altitude illness, affecting, for example, 25% of all visitors sleeping above 8,000 ft (2,500 m) in Colorado. Symptoms are similar to those of an alcohol hangover: headache is the cardinal symptom, sometimes accompanied by fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, and occasionally vomiting.

How do you treat altitude sickness naturally? ›

Here are a few tips that may help you.
  1. Drink a lot of water to keep yourself hydrated. ...
  2. Intake garlic and cloves to enhance the blood flow. ...
  3. Take time to acclimatize to new conditions. ...
  4. Say no to alcohol and caffeine. ...
  5. Getting relief for headaches. ...
  6. Use Acetazolamide to reduce the symptoms of altitude sickness. ...
  7. Eat a lot of carbs.
9 Apr 2018

What herb is good for altitude sickness? ›

The most commonly used herb is Gingko biloba, It is play an important role in AMS prevention, it has tonic effect on the brain, stimulate blood circulation and reduce oxygen requirement of the body, although several negative trials have also been published but still better than the synthetic drugs 51-52..

What supplement is good for high altitude? ›

Iron supplement - oxygen demands increase at altitude, so taking an iron supplement can be a good way to help support the body and maximize the metabolic benefits of being at altitude.

Does magnesium help with altitude? ›

Magnesium is a mineral that is crucial for a number of functions in the body. It is naturally found in many foods. Supplementation of magnesium has often been suggested as an aid for altitude sickness. However when looking at the studies, there is no real evidence of magnesium helping prevent altitude sickness.

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